The POODLE exploit

If you’re on the web much, have any online banking accounts or watch TV news, you’ve probably heard about POODLE in the last few weeks. Rather than reinvent the wheel, I’m going to post some links here for those of you who are interested to peruse. What you need to know about the SSLv3 “POODLE” flaw (CVE-2014-3566) If you use the Internet at all, you’ll want to disable SSLv3 on the apps you use, too.  Here’s how you can disable SSLv3. And, once again, I want to encourage EVERYONE to backup!  Please call us if you need help setting up a backup system.  Or, please just click on this link to buy Carbonite now. Stay safe out...

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Closing a telnet session

Here’s a tip for you command line people. When you use telnet to access a service on another machine, have you ever wondered how to get out of your telnet session? Let’s say we used telnet to check an SMTP host: # telnet someserver.somehost.com 25 Trying 01.02.03.04… Connected to someserver.somehost.com. Escape character is ‘^]’. We know from the clue above that we need to press ctrl and the right bracket to stop the session, but what happens then? We see this: telnet> So now what? Simply type the word “close” and hit the enter key. telnet> close Connection closed. Easy as pie!...

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How to enable compatibility view in Internet Explorer

1. Open Internet Explorer 2. Click on Tools and then Compatibility View Settings 3. Enter in connectnc.com in the Add This Website box 5. Click Add...

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Zoom in for easier web content reading

If you use a higher screen resolution, you might be unhappy about how small the text looks on the web site you visit. Or, you may just need to see bigger text for easier reading. To zoom in, press the Ctrl key and the + (plus) key.  Keep pressing until you have the size that’s right for you.  To zoom out, press the Ctrl key and the –  (minus) key.  If you’re a Mac user, substitute the Command key for the Ctrl key. To reset the size back to default, press Ctrl and the 0 (zero)...

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Wi-fi suddenly very slow?

Recently my home network download speed went from being fast to annoyingly slow. I have a cable connection, and use a wireless device to connect all of my computers, phones, tablet, game systems and printers. Everything goes through the wireless access point. Up until a few weeks ago, everything was ok, so I assumed it was the cable company’s fault, of course.  I soon learned that was not the case. I could directly connect to my cable modem and get really fast download speeds. That meant it had to be my Cisco Linksys Wireless Router.  I suppose it’s old, in Internet time.  The router was working fine though. I realized that there was a new wi-fi network in the neighborhood, and saw that three of us were using channel 6 for our networks. I suspected that could be the problem, and it was a correct assumption.  Once I changed the channel ID, I was back to 20 mbps, up from .05.  What a relief!     By the way, from the screen shot above, you can see why you should secure your network. Any neighbor or passerby could access your shared computers and printers once they’re on your network!  An open network is a bad idea. Read more here:...

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Internet Explorer Stops Responding When Trying To Open A PDF Document

If you are able to open the PDF in other browsers follow the steps below:   A. Close your web browser. B. Start Acrobat or Adobe Reader. C. Choose Edit > Preferences. D. Select Internet in the list on the left. E. Uncheck “Display PDF in Browser”, and click OK. F. Restart Internet explorer

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