Configuring iPad Email for Your Hosting Account

This article describes how to configure your iPad Mail for your ConnectNC hosting account. Please substitute your actual email account information wherever we have used yourdomain.com or chilesauce.com as examples. This is written for an intermediate iPad user. We assume that you understand how to get to your iPad settings, and how to use your iPad to send and receive email. It’s not intended as a training article.  If you need configuration or training for your iPad, we offer that as an additional service. Please contact us to schedule an appointment. In this example, we allowed iPad Mail to use all its default settings. We did not modify anything or have to provide anything except the following three pieces of information. Information required for mail account configuration: Your email address Your email account password Your email server names (mail.yourdomain.com, where “yourdomain.com” is replaced with your actual domain name) 1.  Go to Settings in your iPad.  Tap on Mail, Contacts, Calendars.  Tap Add Account.    2. Tap Other.    3. Tap Add Mail Account.    4. Type in your account information. Name: Your real name as it will appear in the sender field to your recipients. Email: Your full email address. Description: Whatever is meaningful to you, to help you distinguish this account from others. Incoming Mail Server Host Name: mail.yourdomain.com. User Name: Your full email address. Password:  Your account password. Outgoing Mail Server Host Name: mail.yourdomain.com. User Name: Your full email address. Password:  Your account password. Tap Next.    5. If you are presented with the following warning, “Cannot Verify Server Identity,” simply tap Continue. You will see this warning if you have not purchased and installed an SSL certificate for your domain name.  If you wish to purchase and have us install an SSL certificate for you, please contact us.  Otherwise, any time you encounter this warning, please tap Continue.   6.  Turn off Notes and tap Save. If you are using a cellular service, such as AT&T or Verizon to connect to the internet, please note that they may be blocking standard outbound mail ports, so you will need to contact their support to ask which ports are open for sending. If you can send mail while you’re connected to your home or office wi-fi, but cannot send while connected to a cellular service, this is a strong indication that the commonly used ports for sending are being...

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Protect Your

Contact us today for an encrypted email demo!  This email encryption and spam filtering service works in conjunction with your company emails, and can work with your current email hosting provider, or we can host your email instead. Great for: Dentists, Physicians, Real Estate Agents, Attorneys, Financial Advisors, and any business who needs to email important client information...

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FBI issues another warning about tech support phone scams

I’m pasting this in verbatim, because The FBI has very effectively communicated the extent of the problem. Be very careful about giving remote access to your computers to people you don’t know and trust! 3 November 2014 Alert Number I-111314-PSA NEW TWIST TO THE TELEPHONE TECH SUPPORT SCAM The IC3 has produced Scam Alerts in the past advising the public of an ongoing telephone scam in which callers purport to be an employee of a major software company. The callers have strong foreign accents. The callers report the user’s computer is sending error messages and numerous viruses have been detected. The caller convinces the user to give them permission to run a program allowing the caller to gain remote access. The caller advises the virus can be removed for a fee. Intimidation tactics used in this scam have influenced victims to pay fees associated with the removal of alleged viruses. It has been reported to the IC3 an individual who paid the required fees, later received a call advising the victim the funds paid for the services went to India and were used to purchase weapons for ISIS. The call came with an additional request for money to remove the victim’s name from a black list. In a new twist to the tech support scam, cyber criminals attempt to defraud using another avenue. The scam is executed while a user is browsing the Internet. In this scenario, a website being viewed provided a link to articles related to popular topics. The user clicked the link and was redirected to a website which produced a window that advised the user’s computer had been hacked. Another window was displayed that contained a telephone number to obtain assistance. The user reported all attempts to close the windows were ineffective. Upon calling the number for assistance the user was connected with an individual who spoke with a heavy foreign accent claiming to be an Apple representative. During the process the user’s web browser was hijacked. Restarting the computer in an attempt to regain access to the Web produced another message with a different telephone number to obtain assistance. The execution of this fraud is similar to what was reported in a Public Service Announcement (PSA) dated 07/18/2013. The PSA reports on a version of ransomware that targets OS X Mac users. This version is not a malware; it appears as a webpage that...

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The POODLE exploit

If you’re on the web much, have any online banking accounts or watch TV news, you’ve probably heard about POODLE in the last few weeks. Rather than reinvent the wheel, I’m going to post some links here for those of you who are interested to peruse. What you need to know about the SSLv3 “POODLE” flaw (CVE-2014-3566) If you use the Internet at all, you’ll want to disable SSLv3 on the apps you use, too.  Here’s how you can disable SSLv3. And, once again, I want to encourage EVERYONE to backup!  Please call us if you need help setting up a backup system.  Or, please just click on this link to buy Carbonite now. Stay safe out...

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How to generate a CSR in IIS 8

Generating a certificate signing request on Windows Server 2012, with IIS8 Open IIS 8 Administrator and choose the appropriate web server.  Double click on “Server Certificates.” Choose “Create Certificate Request.” Fill in the blanks. Choose 2048 as the bit length. Save the CSR someplace where you can easily find it. Click...

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How to add an auto responder for your hosting account

These instructions apply to the account administrator. If you’re an email account holder, please see the instructions located here.  Click on any of these images to see them in their original size. First, login to your cPanel account by going to http://www.yourdomain.com/cpanel Next, click on the Auto Responders icon. Fill out the information required for the auto responder to be effective. Don’t forget to choose your date range, so the auto responder will end on the right day without your intervention. Click the Create/Modify button when you’re...

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